Psychometrics and Emotional Intelligence

How you behave, evaluate yourself and interact with others.

Psychometrics is a field of study concerned with the theory and technique of psychological measurement. As defined by the National Council on Measurement in Education (NCME), psychometrics refers to psychological measurement. Generally, it refers to the field of psychology and education that is devoted to testing, measurement, assessment, and related activities.

The field is concerned with the objective measurement of skills and knowledge, abilities, attitudes, personality traits, and educational achievement. Some psychometric researchers focus on the construction and validation of assessment instruments such as questionnairestests, raters' judgments, and personality tests. Others focus on research relating to measurement theory (e.g., item response theoryintraclass correlation). Within The Skape Rooms, we often use them wholly or in part depending upon the clients' requirement.

Our practitioners are described as psychometricians. Psychometricians usually possess a specific qualification, and most are psychologists with advanced graduate training. In addition to traditional academic institutions, many psychometricians work for the government or in human resources departments. Others specialise in learning and development.

Emotional intelligence (EI), also known as Emotional quotient (EQ), is the capability of individuals to recognize their own emotions and those of others, to discern between different feelings and label them appropriately, to use emotional information to guide thinking and behavior, and to manage and/or adjust emotions to adapt to environments or achieve one's goal(s).

Although the term first appeared in a 1964 paper by Michael Beldoch, it gained popularity in the 1995 book by that title, written by the author, and science journalist Daniel GolemamThere are currently several models of EI. Goleman's original model may now be considered a mixed model that combines what have subsequently been modelled separately as ability EI and trait EI. Goleman defined EI as the array of skills and characteristics that drive leadership performance. 

  • The trait model was developed by Konstantin Vasily Petrides in 2001. It "encompasses behavioural dispositions and self-perceived abilities and is measured through self-report". 
  • The ability model, developed by Peter Salovey and John Mayer in 2004, focuses on the individual's ability to process emotional information and use it to navigate the social environment.[10]

Studies have shown that people with high EI have greater mental healthjob performance, and leadership skills although no causal relationships have been shown and such findings are likely to be attributable to general intelligence and specific personality traits rather than emotional intelligence as a construct. For example, Goleman indicated that EI accounted for 67% of the abilities deemed necessary for superior performance in leaders, and mattered twice as much as technical expertise or IQ. Other research finds that the effect of EI on leadership and managerial performance is non-significant when ability and personality are controlled for, and that general intelligence correlates very closely with leadership. 

Markers of EI and methods of developing it have become more widely coveted in the past decade. In addition, studies have begun to provide evidence to help characterise the neural mechanisms of emotional intelligence.

 

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